Last edited by Vudorg
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Manuscripts of Iceland found in the catalog.

The Manuscripts of Iceland

  • 51 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by University of Iceland Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Antiques & collectables: books, manuscripts, ephemera & printed matter,
  • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval,
  • History: World,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • Icelandic,
  • Medieval,
  • Books,
  • Iceland,
  • Illumination of books and manuscripts, Medieval,
  • Manuscripts, Icelandic

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsGisli Sigurasson (Editor), Vesteinn Olason (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages195
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9203871M
    ISBN 10997981988X
    ISBN 109789979819882

    Medieval & Renaissance Manuscripts. The Rare Book and Manuscript Library's holdings in this field range chronologically from the eighth century through the twentieth (a miniature by the Spanish Forger), with the majority in the fifteenth century. through almost all the countries of western Europe, including Iceland. Textually, the.   The laws of Mediaeval Iceland provide detailed and fascinating insight into the society that produced the Icelandic sagas. Known collectively as Gragas (Greygoose), this great legal code offers a wealth of information about early European legal systems and the society of the Middle Ages/5(9).

      The valhnútur, Icelandic for endless knot, is a design motif that appears in several handwritten Icelandic manuscripts from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This needlework version is inspired by a pattern recorded in the Skaftafell Book, drawn by an eighteenth-century farmer, Jón Einarsson. The colors for this design were inspired by a seventeenth-century bridal bench cushion in . England and Scotland are an island, and yet each is a kingdom for itself. Ireland is a great island. Iceland is also a great island north of Ireland. These countries are all in that part of the world which is called Europe. p. C. GRIPLA. 1. Codex No.

      F or Tunglið, how you publish is as important as what you publish. Named after the Icelandic word for the moon, the tiny publisher prints its books Author: James Reith. This volume of Opuscula presents ten articles on a single theme: manuscript and print in late premodern Iceland, specifically the period between the advent of print in the early sixteenth century and the establishment of the Icelandic State Broadcasting Service in the early twentieth. Throughout this period, manuscript transmission continued to exist side by side with print, the two media.


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The Manuscripts of Iceland Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ancient manuscripts of iceland are truly among the world's most precious and beautiful possessions. It is hard to imagine the incredibly difficult task of bringing them to the public, but this volume succeeds on all fronts.

It is itself a work of the printer's finest art, well-made, superbly set, and with one wonderful photograph after the 5/5(1). If you want to know about the physical manuscripts of Iceland this is the book to read. You will learn about the vellum and the ink and the history of these books.

The last few essays tell of their immense influence on the modern world. The essays are a little on the dry side. On a positive note the photographs of these relicts are spectacular/5. This book was written in Iceland in and The back cover is dated The text follows that of earlier manuscripts and printed books.

However the book contains a nice collection of illustrated pages on pages (many of which are reproduced below). The situation regarding manuscripts written on paper is similar. The oldest extant paper manuscript is probably the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Reykjavík, AM 8vo, which contains Bishop Gizzur Einarsson’s book of correspondence from Author: Silvia Hufnagel.

"The manuscripts of Iceland, originally published as Handritin, accompanying an exhibition by the Ární Magnússon Institute in Iceland, which opened in the Culture House, Reykjavík, October 5, "--Preliminary page.

Description: vi,[4] pages: illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm. Series Title: Ritröð Þjóðmenningarhúss., vol. From tohundreds of ancient Icelandic manuscripts were returned from Denmark to Iceland, including, inthe Codex Regius, which is now preserved by the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies in Reykjavík.

Codex Wormianus (AM fol) was written in the mid-fourteenth century. Descrizione libro Iceland University Press, Paperback. Condizione: Very Good. Manuscripts of Iceland This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged/5(9).

Icelandic manuscripts: Sagas, history, and art Hardcover – January 1, by Jónas Kristjánsson (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Cited by: 6. There are around 60 items of Icelandic origin in the Manuscripts and Archives Research Library; many of these are 18th-century transcripts of legal texts, poetry, medical texts, prose texts and the sagas.

A comprehensive and profusely illustrated accompaniment to the exhibition The Manuscripts of Iceland which was organised by the Arni Magnusson Institute and opened in. A ship load of manuscripts being transported from Iceland to Denmark was lost at sea in ; when Árni Magnússon tried to trace what had been lost, he was told it was "a load of parchment book rubbish." The surviving sagas themselves attest to the lost literature.

Some of the sagas refer to stories that are not known to have survived. Detailed catalogue entries for each of Magnús’s manuscripts are being produced as a part of the ICELANDIC SCRIBES project, and the pages for the individual manuscripts will continue to be updated as these entries are completed.

Iceland (29 manuscripts) Reykjavík: National. Get this from a library. Mirrors of virtue: manuscript and print in late pre-modern Iceland.

[Margrét Eggertsdóttir; Matthew James Driscoll;] -- "As a departure from previous practice, this volume of 'Opuscula' presents ten articles on a single theme: manuscript and print in late pre-modern Iceland, the period between the advent of print in. Media in category "Icelandic medieval manuscripts" The following 19 files are in this category, out of 19 total.

A page from the Sturlinga 2, × 2,; MB. The Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections is Cornell’s principal repository of rare books, manuscripts and archival materials in history, literature, music, the arts, science, natural history, and technology.

Our collections include more thanprinted volumes, more than 80 million manuscripts, and another million photographs. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages ) and indexes.

Summary As a departure from previous practice, this volume of Opuscula presents ten articles on a single theme: manuscript and print in late pre-modern Iceland, the period between the advent of print in the early sixteenth century to the establishment of the Icelandic State Broadcasting Service in the early twentieth.

The Westfjords were one of the cultural centres of post-medieval Iceland, and the origin of many manuscripts can be traced to this area. One family in particular was paramount in seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript culture, that of Séra Jón Arason íthere are over thirty manuscripts extant that were written or commissioned by him or other family members, most notably Author: Silvia Hufnagel.

The annual jólabókaflóð, or Christmas Book Flood, is a beloved Icelandic tradition. Every year around Christmastime, publishing houses across Iceland unleash a deluge of new books on the marketplace and inundate bookstores with stacks of fresh titles for the holiday season. The collection of sixteen essays contained in The Manuscripts of Iceland was originally published, in Icelandic as Handritin, to accompany an exhibition that opened on October 5 th, in the Culture House in ongoing exhibition of fifteen manuscripts, which was organized by the Árni Magnússon Institute, is a truly impressive display of some of Iceland’s most famous manuscripts.

This is a comprehensive and profusely illustrated accompaniment to the exhibition The Manuscripts of Iceland, which was organised by the Arni Magnusson Institute and opened in the Culture House in Reykjavik on October 5, In this collection of articles, scholars present the story of Icelandic manuscripts, their medieval origins, the literature they contain and its influence up to the.

Thus despite its late date (ca.around the time of the Lutheran Reformation in Iceland), this copy of Jónsbók--Iceland’s law code, in force from the late 13th through the end of the 17th century--is essentially a medieval manuscript.

Jónsbók. Iceland, fifteenth century. view image.The most beautiful of all Icelandic manuscripts, the Flateyjarbók (c. ), includes versions of sagas of Olaf I Tryggvason and St. Olaf, together with texts from other sagas or about heroes associated with Iceland.

Prose. Prose literature of the 14th century includes several sagas. Reykjabók was written in Iceland aroundand while it may not be among the most visually impressive manuscripts, it is very much a question of not judging a book by its cover. The manuscript is one of the main manuscripts of Njáls saga, one of the most famous of the Icelandic Sagas, containing the oldest almost complete text of the story.